The leveling guides on my site are essentially speed leveling guides.  My leveling guides are the same guides I use myself to speedrun to 60 on new servers to get 60 server first.  I list many occasions where I tell the player to "die on purpose" to go faster.  I tell the player to skip certain quests, because some quests are just not worth the time/XP.  I list tricks and shortcuts to go faster so you can reach level 60 much quicker.  I am still constantly going through them over and over again perfecting the guides to make them faster and easier to follow.  For the most part, the guide can be followed without the need from other player's help, as the whole guide was made from a solo run anyways.  Although I do list quests that can optionally be done if you have a group.

If you thought your job was done after reaching level 60 and filling out your talent tree, then you’re in for a big surprise! Hitting the level cap is just the first step, because now you’ll actually need to take the time to optimize your character. While a mail agility helm might have worked for leveling because it was all you could find, you’ll definitely want a plate one offering strength.

In-Game Addon Version of My Leveling Guides:  As of June 6th the In-Game Addon version of my leveling guides has began construction!  It will be a long road before it's finished completely, so I cannot guarantee how much of it will be ready for Classic Launch but there is a decent chance that some starting zones will be complete for it by then.  It will be full of features, including:  waypoint arrows, automatic updating, and much more.  More features will be available for it overtime too.


Please note that the Strategy Guide covers World of Warcraft version 1.0, which was the last version before the game’s release version 1.1. Using this as a base, it is possible to find out when content was added. The Master Guide, the Battle Chest Guide and the Dungeon Companion cover content for the game’s release version 1.12, thus providing us with a clear view on which content was available in the last branch of vanilla WoW. It is important to note that none of these books cover extended stats for creatures, quests, etc.; only the basics are covered. Thus it should be considered that these books at least provide a view on what content actually existed and what did not exist during vanilla WoW."
Jack of all trades — Arms/Fury/Protection 31/5/15. This build was the meat and potatoes Warrior build of classic WoW. This was the build you picked if you were going to do some tanking, some PVP, and you weren’t the main tank of your raid guild or just didn’t want to have to switch specs around constantly. It does a little bit of everything — it has Mortal Strike for those bosses that had a self heal, it lets you switch to a big 2h weapon (although you don’t get 2h Weapon Specialization) in your off hours, it’s basically the I’m not going to be the best at anything but I can do anything you need spec. There are variants for players who wanted to do more damage — swapping out Improved Thunder Clap and Hamstring for 2h Weapon Spec, for example.
Slam Fury Build — 19/32 or 20/31 Fury. This build comes in several varieties. This one makes sure to get Bloodthirst, the signature Fury attack, but it doesn’t include Improved Execute and it doesn’t have full 2h Weapon Specialization from the Arms tree. This variant, which is the one I used, doesn’t go full into Improved Slam so the cast time is a bit longer, but it has Improved Execute and full 2h Weapon Specialization. You can do without Bloodthirst entirely if you prefer, and still get Improved Slam, Flurry, and 2h Weapon Spec all maxed out, which some players preferred. All of these builds used 2h weapons in PVE content, as Fury was basically untenable in PVP, although I still did PVP in my variant of the spec. By the end of classic WoW my gear allowed me to do fairly well, but it was a handicap and I knew it.
The Dedicated Offtank — Arms/Protection 31/20. This build still allows for some oomph when you’re not tanking but focuses more heavily on tanking, with a full 20 points in Protection for picking up some Defiance and Improved Shield Block. It’s still not a main tanking build, but it gives you options for when you’re not raiding or running a dungeon and a lot of Warriors used it in classic. You can vary it up by altering how many points you put in Defiance vs. other talents, like this version that gets you Last Stand, which many tanks swore by.
This is not going to be a talent by talent breakdown, although I might well sit down and write one of those if there’s interest. This is me giving you a look at various talent builds you can adopt once WoW Classic is out, and get an idea of what to aim for. In general, while leveling you should use your primary talent tree as your first one to spend points in — get up the tree to 31 and that big, primary attack (Mortal Strike, Bloodthirst or Shield Slam) as fast as possible. That’s a spec defining ability and you want to get it ASAP. From there, you can start spending points  in the other trees.
Even though the guide was developed with a hunter, the guide can be followed by any class.  Except you have to do your class's quests which aren't a whole lot.  I do have full intention to make my guide friendly with all classes in the future by listing all of their steps as well.  There will be a toggle that allows you to show which class's steps you want to see in the guide.  But this is coming later.
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