Mining – You might find it odd to see a crafting profession in here, but warriors don’t actually require any professions to maximize their damage. Any crafted weapons or armor are tradeable, meaning that you can collect the raw materials yourself and have someone else make them for you. Mining doesn’t offer direct bonuses, but will make it easier (and cheaper) to acquire crafted weapons and armor.


As a warrior, you need to be up close and personal in order to deal damage. This puts you directly in harm’s way, so you’ll need to keep a close eye on your character to ensure your safety! Make sure to run out of fire on the ground, and never attack bosses from the front! This will allow them to dodge and parry your abilities, effectively reducing your DPS.
The Dedicated Offtank — Arms/Protection 31/20. This build still allows for some oomph when you’re not tanking but focuses more heavily on tanking, with a full 20 points in Protection for picking up some Defiance and Improved Shield Block. It’s still not a main tanking build, but it gives you options for when you’re not raiding or running a dungeon and a lot of Warriors used it in classic. You can vary it up by altering how many points you put in Defiance vs. other talents, like this version that gets you Last Stand, which many tanks swore by.

I made some route changes to the Horde levels 43-44 sections.  I have swapped 44 Dustwallow Marsh with 44 Desolace (the entire sections). This allowed me to do Deadmire (at lvl 43 instead of 38) and then go stop at TB to turn in Deadmire + The Black Shield at the same time, then fly quickly to do the Desolace stuff.  Doing 44 Desolace is now mandatory because I think its faster with the new routes. This will also make the level 53 grind much shorter.  I think these were great changes.
If you’re serious about playing WoW Classic as a Warrior, you’re probably looking at those talents and wondering what to do — especially if you didn’t play in Vanilla and have no idea what all those talents are. Well, I did play in Vanilla — in fact, I talk about it way too much as one might expect of an old crotchety sort who wants these kids off his lawn — and so now you get the chance to profit from my barely healed trauma as I talk about the popular talent specs that Warriors used back in the day, just in time for you to climb on up into WoW Classic when it comes out.
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Welcome to the third r/classicwow 4-Day Chat! The 4-Day Chats are a series of posts that will be stickied for exactly four days. The purpose of this series is to open a larger forum for back-and-forth discussion about major topics pertaining to WoW Classic, with particular focus on currently hot-topics of discussion. As soon as this post is unstickied, a new one with a different topic will replace it. We'll continue this series for the next month or so and then let it fade a way for a while, as we're expecting to have other more pertinent posts take-over the two stickied slots we're allotted as launch day nears.
For the standard, dual-wielding fury talent tree, you’ll actually place 34 points into the fury tree and just 17 into arms. This allows you to acquire both ranks of Impale in the arms tree, while maximizing any damage bonuses found in the fury tree. Options here include selecting Improved Cleave over Improved Battle Shout in situations needing more area of effect damage.

For each character level (up to 60), there will be 5 levels worth of weapon skill. This means that each different weapon skill requires 300 levels on a level 60 warrior. The reason why this matters is because of how glancing blows work on enemies. The basic concept behind weapon skill is that a higher weapon skill will result in less damage lost. With a lower weapon skill, your attacks have a chance of dealing reduced damage.


Two handed fury is far less viable for Alliance players considering they don’t have access to shamans or Windfury. You’ll note that Improved Cleave is now standard, as you no longer need points in Dual Wield Specialization. You’ll also need to grab 3 points in Two-Handed Weapon Specialization found in the arms tree, the talent choice that really sets the build apart.

So, if you happen to have two good 1h weapons, and are Fury specced, don't be afraid to try out dual wielding. Some people swear by it, and I can see why. Getting misses/parries with 2h weapon is cancer, and having two weapon swings for two different chances at crit, can really help smooth out your damage and make it less random. If you're still skeptical, I'd suggest trying it out once you get Thrash Blade, or if you happen to have a Flurry Axe. With really sick 1h weapons, dual-wielding can definitely feel great.
I joined twitch in 2013 with the gamer name of FuriousPaul and I streamed speedruns of the classic Castlevania games full time from 2013 - 2017. Lately my streams have died down quite a bit due to working on Classic WoW leveling guides every day.  My channel is now twitch.tv/Joana.  Unfortunately I will have to wait until Classic WoW comes out before I start streaming it.
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